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Barack Obama Isn’t Hiding It Anymore, Comes Out With Major Announcement

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“The Democratic Party has always made the biggest difference in the lives of the American people when we lead with conviction, principle, and bold, new ideas,” Obama said in a statement sent to reporters.

Former President Barack Obama endorsed Democratic socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Monday in her New York congressional race.

The former president did not include Ocasio-Cortez in his first round of endorsements in the congressional midterms but included her in his second round of over 250 additional endorsements announced on Monday.

“Our incredible array of candidates up and down the ticket, all across the country, make up a movement of citizens who are younger, more diverse, more female than ever before,” Obama said. “They’re Americans who aren’t just running against something, but for something.”

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Ocasio-Cortez shocked the political establishment after she defeated an entrenched House Democrat voicing a political platform of socialism. The former president also endorsed Democratic socialist candidate Andrew Gillum, who is running for Governor of Florida.

Obama also endorsed current Sen. Bill Nelson in Florida for re-election, as well as Sen. Tammy Baldwin in Wisconsin and Sen. Tina Smith in Minnesota. He also endorsed Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, who is running for Sen. Jeff Flake’s seat after the Arizona Republican announced his retirement.

However, not all dems were on board with Obama as he announced back in September of his first rounds of endorsements

Obama has kept a low political profile since leaving office, but sources familiar with his plans say he will soon hit the campaign trail to help Democrats in their quest to take back the House, protect vulnerable Senate incumbents and win state legislative races.

The former president will kick off his push by delivering a speech at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on Friday. In the weeks ahead, Obama will also campaign in California, Illinois, Ohio and Pennsylvania, a person familiar with his schedule said.

Not all Democrats want Obama’s help.

Democratic candidates running in states that President Trump won by double digits in 2016 would prefer that the former president stay far away.

Some Democrats in pro-Trump states, such as Sens. Bob Casey Jr. (Pa.), Debbie Stabenow (Mich.) and Sherrod Brown (Ohio), say they hope Obama will campaign for them.

Others, such as Sens. Jon Tester (Mont.) and Heidi Heitkamp (N.D.), want to keep the race locked on the battle between themselves and their state rivals, fearing a high-profile surrogate like Obama could distract from the strategy.

“We’re not going to use any surrogates. Surrogates are fine but we don’t need them. The race is myself and Matt Rosendale and that’s the way we want to keep it,” Tester told The Hill, referring to his GOP challenger.

Asked if she thought Obama might show up in North Dakota, Heitkamp said: “Nope, no.”

“He threatened to campaign against me once so I don’t think he’s coming out there,” she said.

While the former president remains extremely popular with the Democratic base, especially among African-American voters, Democrats fear his entrance into some battleground states could inadvertently rev up conservatives and pro-Trump voters.

“Trump wants nothing more than a foil. He knows he can activate the other side,” said a source familiar with Obama’s thinking.

The former president is “going to be involved this fall in a very Obamaesque, smart way,” the source added.

Democrats say that one way Obama can have a big impact on races is by urging infrequent voters to show up to the polls in November, something that will be a major theme of the former president’s speech on Friday.

“He will echo his call to reject the rising strain of authoritarian politics and policies. And he will preview arguments he’ll make this fall, specifically that Americans must not fall victim to our own apathy by refusing to do the most fundamental thing demanded of us as citizens: vote,” said Obama communications director Katie Hill.

Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.), the chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC), said the party welcomes Obama’s help but noted it’s up to individual candidates whether to invite him to their states.

We welcome his participation in these races as a DSCC. Every Senate candidate will decide in conversation with President Obama whether it makes sense for him to come to their states,” Van Hollen said on CSPAN’s “Newsmakers” program last month.

Van Hollen noted that Obama held a joint fundraiser for the DSCC and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee last year.

Obama also held a fundraiser in May for Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), who is running in a state Trump won by 19 points.

Still, the former president has held off on endorsing Democratic senators running in states won by Trump, even though he has backed Democratic candidates down the ballot in some of those states.

For example, while he endorsed Richard Cordray, Betty Sutton and Steve Dettelbach, the Democratic candidates for governor, lieutenant governor and attorney general in Ohio, respectively — as well as two U.S. House candidates and a slew of state House candidates in the Buckeye State — he did not endorse Brown, the incumbent U.S. senator.

Asked why his name was missing from Obama’s endorsement list, Brown said, “I don’t have any idea” but added, “I make nothing of that.”

The Democratic senator noted that Obama is likely to make additional endorsements and said he would welcome his support.

“I’d love for him to come to Ohio and help us with voter turnout for Cordray and for me,” he said.

Democratic sources say Obama will campaign with Casey in Pennsylvania, even though the former president also didn’t include him on the list of candidates from the Keystone State he endorsed last month.

Obama announced his support for two House candidates in Pennsylvania, Madeleine Dean and Susan Wild, and three state House candidates, but not Casey.

Trump carried both Ohio and Pennsylvania over Hillary Clinton in 2016. He won Ohio by 8 points and Pennsylvania by less than 1 point.

When Obama made his first round of endorsements in August, he stayed away from Democratic Senate candidates with the exception of Rep. Jacky Rosen (D), who is running to unseat Sen. Dean Heller (R) in Nevada — the only Senate battleground that Trump lost.

Obama’s endorsement in state and local races is less likely to hurt Democratic candidates because those contests are often less partisan than federal races. The GOP strategy in Senate races in red states is to tie the centrist Democratic incumbents to party leaders in Washington.

One Democratic strategist said the lack of endorsements from Obama falls under the ‘do no harm’ category.

“Both of those senators are doing well their respective states and they don’t exactly need Obama’s seal of approval. In fact, it might do more harm than good,” the strategist said. “Obama is still popular with certain folks in those states but he’s not exactly popular with some others.”

But Chuck Rocha, a Democratic strategist, said he doesn’t think it has to do with unpopularity but a focus on races that need his support.

“There are others who have tougher races than Sherrod’s and Casey’s,” he said. “Those races are shaping up to be easier than some others … And they have robust war chests so they don’t really need Barack Obama’s endorsement.”

Rocha said he wouldn’t expect Obama to endorse senators like Tester and Heitkamp. “Places like that, they’re probably not advocating to get that endorsement.”

A person familiar with Obama’s thinking cautioned against reading too much into his endorsements, noting that he will come out with another round before Election Day.

Casey expects to receive Obama’s support and to campaign with him in the next few weeks.

“We look forward to campaigning with him, we hope, in the fall. I hope to. I don’t know what the schedule will be,” he said.

Casey said he thinks Obama would help Democrats up and down the ballot if he campaigns in Pennsylvania and noted that Obama has made it a priority to focus on local races in order to give Democrats more leverage in future congressional redistricting.

Patrick Rodenbush, communications director for the National Democratic Redistricting Committee, said Obama has been very helpful in trying to give Democrats more influence over future congressional district maps.

“He helped us with fundraising since we were launched in 2017,” he noted. “He cut a video for us in July about the stakes of redistricting and why these elections in November matter.”

“He’s going to hit the road in September. We expect he’ll talk about the issue of redistricting when he’s out on the trail,” he added.

Obama also headlined fundraisers for the Democratic National Committee in September of last year and this past June.

 

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REPORT: Mueller’s Investigation Is Over… NO COLLUSION

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As the most reliable and balanced news aggregation service in the world, RWN offers the following information published by: Sara Palin

It is being reported that Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into President Trump and his 2016 presidential campaign is over, or is at least in its final stages.

In an exclusive report, One American News Network claims the Mueller investigation has “thoroughly investigated all known possible individuals” and has been unable to make a connection between officials on the Trump campaign team, WikiLeaks officials, or Russian sources.

From their report:

Mueller’s investigators have been focused on determining whether there was direct or indirect communications with WikiLeaks and Russian sources loosely associated with the 2016 Trump campaign.

Specifically, Mueller’s team has been aggressively drilling down to determine if there was any advance knowledge of anyone remotely associated with the Trump campaign, and advanced notice of the leaked DNC documents and hacked John Podesta’s email.

Mueller”s investigation team has thoroughly investigated all known possible individuals with potential advanced knowledge of the leaked documents. A number of individuals have been interrogated, some multiple times to date. Documents in at least the hundreds of thousands have been reviewed. Computer equipment has been reviewed by top electronic forensic teams, and a long list of individuals have been subpoenaed and interrogated.

Per the report, Steve Bannon, Dr. Jerome Corsi, Tandy Credico, Theodore “Ted” Roosevelt Malloch, Sam Nunsberg, and Roger Stone have all been subpoenaed and interrogated for information about potential advanced knowledge of the WikiLeaks release of private emails of Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairman John Podesta.

And:

The implication is that Roger Stone knew well in advance that the Podesta emails were hacked and would be released.

There is no credible evidence indicating that Roger Stone or any other individuals loosely associated to the Trump 2016 campaign had any advance knowledge of the WikiLeak, DNC and Podesta emails.

The investigation is wrapping up regarding Roger Stone’s possible collusion with no findings.

Check it out:

Here’s more on Jerome Corsi’s interaction with the Mueller investigation, via the Wall Street Journal:

Corsi said that he had turned over his computers and phone records to investigators in an effort to cooperate and demonstrate that he had nothing to hide. Mr. Corsi was also questioned by investigators about his interactions with other conservative activists and the website WikiLeaks before a grand jury, The Wall Street Journal previously reported.

“We had nothing to hide,” Mr. Corsi said on YouTube about his cooperation with the special counsel investigation.

And:

During the 2016 campaign, Mr. Corsi was also a part of a small, informal network of researchers and activists on the margins of Republican politics who were looking for incriminating information about Hillary Clinton, Mr. Trump’s Democratic rival. The Journal has previously reported that the special counsel is looking at whether Mr. Corsi or any other activists had advance knowledge of email hacks and leaks that U.S. intelligence agencies have said were part of a Russian campaign to help Mr. Trump win.

Prosecutors have been scrutinizing messages sent between Mr. Corsi and Roger Stone, a Trump confidant, in which they discussed material that would eventually be released by WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, according to a person familiar with the matter. In his YouTube broadcast, Mr. Corsi asserted that he had “figured out” that Mr. Assange had emails from Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta.

Some outlets report the Mueller investigation could make more indictments as early as today regarding the Russia probe, but it is not believe they are related to collusion.

Note: The author of this article has included commentary that expresses an opinion and analysis of the facts.


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Mueller reportedly plans to issue new indictments in the Russia investigation TODAY

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The special counsel Robert Mueller is expected to issue new indictments as part of the Russia investigation as soon as Tuesday, CBS reported, citing multiple sources with knowledge of the probe.

Meanwhile, acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker plans to consult with Department of Justice ethics officials about whether he should recuse himself from the investigation into the Trump campaign’s ties to Russia, a department representative said Monday.

Since Mueller took over the investigation in May 2017, his team has charged four Americans once affiliated with Trump’s campaign or administration, 13 Russian nationals, 12 Russian intelligence officers, three Russian companies, and three other people.

They include Paul Manafort, the former Trump campaign chairman, George Papadopoulos, a former Trump campaign adviser, and Michael Flynn, Trump’s former national security adviser.

Talks between Manafort and Mueller’s team have reportedly stalled.

November and December are widely expected to be busy months for Mueller, following a quiet period during which prosecutors, following DOJ guidelines, avoided taking any actions that could be seen as influencing the outcome of the midterm elections.

For months, Mueller has been zeroing in on the longtime GOP strategist Roger Stone and his associates. At the center of Mueller’s focus is whether Stone or any other Trump associates had advance knowledge that Russia had stolen batches of emails from the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton’s campaign and disseminated them via the pro-transparency group WikiLeaks, founded by Julian Assange.

In addition to Stone, Mueller has also focused on the far-right commentator Jerome Corsi, who told NBC News on Monday that Mueller’s team told him he would be indicted.

“I don’t recall ever meeting Julian Assange or getting information from anyone about what he had including the Podesta emails,” Corsi said Monday, referring to John Podesta, the Clinton campaign manager. “But they have all your emails and phone records … They’re very good at the perjury trap.” Continue Reading…

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