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Democrat Swamp Slugs Caught In Caravan Scandal – Voters Turning On Them BIG TIME

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Name one good thing a certain political party has done for the country? No one on this planet would be able to name any good they have done for the planet.

This is what happens when they are voted in. Remember that when you vote this November!

From Project Syndicate:

BERKELEY – After 95 consecutive months of job growth, the United States unemployment rate has fallen to 3.7%, its lowest point since 1969. Yet wage growth remains stubbornly slow. In fact, after adjusting for inflation, the median weekly earnings of full-time workers are about the same as they were in 1979. In a related indicator of stress on American workers, the number of homeless people in the US actually rose in 2017 – the first increase since 2010 – partly driven by skyrocketing rents and housing prices.

Trending: Hell To Pay! Trump Just Dropped Anvil On Leaker And Called Them Out BY NAME

West Coast cities are among the hardest hit. From Seattle to the San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles, tech workers earning six-figure salaries are dodging tent cities to get to work, and state and city governments are under increasing pressure to respond. At the same time, funding for US Department of Housing and Urban Development programs has fallen below what it was in 2010 (adjusting for inflation).

Getting an accurate count of the homeless is difficult, in part because it is an unstable population. People can be driven into homelessness by many contingencies, including income insecurity, eviction, transition from incarceration, domestic violence, drug abuse, and mental health issues. Recent estimates indicate that more than 550,000 people experience homelessness in the US on any given night, with about two-thirds ending up in emergency shelters or transitional housing programs, and one-third finding their way to unsheltered locations like parks, vehicles, and metro stations. According to the Urban Institute, about 25% of homeless people have jobs.

Homelessness also varies significantly by state. In 2017, California, New York, Hawaii, and the District of Columbia had the largest number of homeless per 10,000 residents. Not surprisingly, eight of the ten states with the highest rate of homelessness also had the highest median housing costs.

In California, which accounts for 12% of the US population but 25% of its homeless, this issue has moved to the top of the political agenda. In 2017, Los Angeles voters passed tax measures to raise $1.2 billion for additional housing for the chronically homeless and $355 million for expanded services for the homeless. Other revenue-raising measures are on local ballots in several California cities in the November election. In San Francisco, Marc Benioff, Chairman and co-CEO of Salesforce (one of the city’s largest employers), supports a proposed tax on gross business receipts to combat homelessness, though Mayor London Breed, a Democrat, and other tech employers (including Twitter) oppose the measure.

More funding is certainly needed. But for it to be effective, policymakers should focus on three key areas: prevention; immediate and direct support for the homeless; and assistance for those making the transition to more stable housing. Moreover, governments will need a more accurate assessment of the homeless population. A mother fleeing domestic abuse with her children has different needs than a veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder.

Preventing homelessness is both cost-effective and humane, but it requires that people have adequate incomes to cover basic needs, including housing. Of 3,007 counties in the US, a worker earning the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour can afford a one-bedroom rental in only 12. In San Francisco, where the median house price is over $1.5 million, a single mother earning the minimum wage would have to work 120 hours per week to meet her basic needs. And even outside of high-cost regions, nearly two-thirds of US households lack the savings to cover a $500 shock such as a car repair or health-care expense. For these families, one bad turn can result in homelessness.

Moreover, today’s inadequate safety net denies many citizens access to benefits that could prevent homelessness. Three out of four households that qualify for federal housing assistance are not receiving it, owing to conflicting eligibility requirements, duplicative applications, and complex multi-agency approval processes. Young people exiting foster care or incarceration, as well as people with serious health challenges, are too often left to fend for themselves. And local governments urgently need to do more to ensure that proper eviction standards are being followed.

Unfortunately, the surge in homelessness has strained municipal and local governments’ capacity to respond. For example, in Seattle, with the third-largest homeless population among US cities, a per-employee tax on large companies was soon repealed under intense business pressure. As a result, shelter for the homeless is often provided by cash-strapped social-sector or religious organizations, and the waiting lines for admission to such facilities are long and growing.
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Whoopi Starts Screaming At Trump Says He Needs To “Shut Up” – TOO BAD!

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As the most reliable and balanced news aggregation service in the world, RWN offers the following information published by: Breitbart News

Monday on ABC’s “The View,” co-host Whoopi Goldberg criticized President Donald Trump for his comments about the California wildfires.

In a video clip from his California weekend visit, Trump said, “I was with the president of Finland and he said we’re a forest nation. He called it a forest nation. And they spend a lot of time on raking and cleaning and doing things and they don’t have any problem and when it is, it’s a very small problem.”

Goldberg said, “Actually, as you probably know, Finland has a very different atmosphere. They get rain periodically. California, it doesn’t rain much so raking really isn’t going to help. You know, just being realistic. And the Finnish president said he never suggested raking, you know. I don’t know why the new guy just won’t acknowledge that if you don’t have any rain, raking everything out is fine but if everything’s is dry someone drops a cigarette or someone lights the fire or, you know, some spark happens, stuff’s going to burn. Raking it is not going to really help. So I would like him to stop with this raking stuff.”

Co-host Joy Behar said, “When did he become an expert on forest fires? Who is he, Smokey the Bear all of a sudden?”

Co-host Sunny Hostin said, “It’s amazing, I have some really good friends that are from Finland and the Fins are having such a ball with this. There are memes online with them vacuuming the forest. My friend is sending me all this stuff but in a sense, we’ve almost become the laughing stock in so many places.”

She added, “And it’s just so embarrassing because if you know anything about Finland, it rains like half the year. It’s really cold.”

Goldberg said, “What I need him to do is shut up. And I try not to be, you know, I try not to be too rude, but you know what, people lost their lives. Families lost their homes. This is not a joke. Raking? I’m sorry. Raking is not funny to people in California. This is not cute, you know, this idea. And if you don’t know this, if you really don’t know this, man, everybody needs to start rethinking what you’re saying and how you’re saying it because you sure don’t give a damn about the people in California.”

She added, “I just want him to stop talking in California. People are dying. People died. People lost everything. Listen, if you’re not going to help stay home.”

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Tijuana Protesters Chant ‘Out!’ At Migrants Camped in City

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TIJUANA, Mexico (AP) – Hundreds of Tijuana residents congregated around a monument in an affluent section of the city south of California on Sunday to protest the thousands of Central American migrants who have arrived via caravan in hopes of a new life in the U.S.

Tensions have built as nearly 3,000 migrants from the caravan poured into Tijuana in recent days after more than a month on the road, and with many more months ahead of them while they seek asylum. The federal government estimates the number of migrants could soon swell to 10,000.

U.S. border inspectors are processing only about 100 asylum claims a day at Tijuana’s main crossing to San Diego. Asylum seekers register their names in a tattered notebook managed by migrants themselves that had more than 3,000 names even before the caravan arrived.

On Sunday, displeased Tijuana residents waved Mexican flags, sang the Mexican national anthem and chanted “Out! Out!” in front of a statue of the Aztec ruler Cuauhtemoc, 1 mile (1.6 kilometers) from the U.S. border. They accused the migrants of being messy, ungrateful and a danger to Tijuana. They also complained about how the caravan forced its way into Mexico, calling it an “invasion.” And they voiced worries that their taxes might be spent to care for the group.

“We don’t want them in Tijuana,” protesters shouted.

Juana Rodriguez, a housewife, said the government needs to conduct background checks on the migrants to make sure they don’t have criminal records.

A woman who gave her name as Paloma lambasted the migrants, who she said came to Mexico in search of handouts. “Let their government take care of them,” she told video reporters covering the protest.

A block away, fewer than a dozen Tijuana residents stood with signs of support for the migrants. Keyla Zamarron, a 38-year-old teacher, said the protesters don’t represent her way of thinking as she held a sign saying: Childhood has no borders.

Most of the migrants who have reached Tijuana via caravan in recent days set out more than a month ago from Honduras, a country of 9 million people. Dozens of migrants in the caravan who have been interviewed by Associated Press reporters have said they left their country after death threats.

But the journey has been hard, and many have turned around.

Alden Rivera, the Honduran ambassador in Mexico, told the AP on Saturday that 1,800 Hondurans have returned to their country since the caravan first set out on Oct. 13, and that he hopes more will make that decision. “We want them to return to Honduras,” said Rivera.

Honduras has a murder rate of 43 per 100,000 residents, similar to U.S. cities like New Orleans and Detroit. In addition to violence, migrants in the caravan have mentioned poor economic prospects as a motivator for their departures. Per capita income hovers around $120 a month in Honduras, where the World Bank says two out of three people live in poverty.

The migrants’ expected long stay in Tijuana has raised concerns about the ability of the border city of more than 1.6 million people to handle the influx.

While many in Tijuana are sympathetic to the migrants’ plight and trying to assist, some locals have shouted insults, hurled rocks and even thrown punches at them. The cold reception contrasts sharply with the warmth that accompanied the migrants in southern Mexico, where residents of small towns greeted them with hot food, campsites and even live music.

Tijuana Mayor Juan Manuel Gastelum has called the migrants’ arrival an “avalanche” that the city is ill-prepared to handle, calculating that they will be in Tijuana for at least six months as they wait to file asylum claims. Gastelum has appealed to the federal government for more assistance to cope with the influx.

Mexico’s Interior Ministry said Saturday that the federal government was flying in food and blankets for the migrants in Tijuana.

Tijuana officials converted a municipal gymnasium and recreational complex into a shelter to keep migrants out of public spaces. The city’s privately run shelters have a maximum capacity of 700. The municipal complex can hold up to 3,000.

At the municipal shelter, Josue Caseres, 24, expressed dismay at the protests against the caravan. “We are fleeing violence,” said the entertainer from Santa Barbara, Honduras. “How can they think we are going to come here to be violent?”

Some from the caravan have diverted to other border cities, such as Mexicali, a few hours to the east of Tijuana.

Elsewhere on Sunday, a group of 200 migrants headed north from El Salvador, determined to also find safety in numbers to reach the U.S. Edwin Alexander Gomez, 20, told AP in San Salvador that he wants to work construction in New York, where he hears the wages are better and the city is safer.

U.S. President Donald Trump, who sought to make the caravan a campaign issue in the midterm elections, used Twitter on Sunday to voice support for the mayor of Tijuana and try to discourage the migrants from seeking entry to the U.S.

Trump wrote that like Tijuana, “the U.S. is ill-prepared for this invasion, and will not stand for it. They are causing crime and big problems in Mexico. Go home!”

He followed that tweet by writing: “Catch and Release is an obsolete term. It is now Catch and Detain. Illegal Immigrants trying to come into the U.S.A., often proudly flying the flag of their nation as they ask for U.S. Asylum, will be detained or turned away.”

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