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US Capitol Police Arrest Democrat Who Doxxed GOP Senators During Kav Hearing, He Worked For FEINSTEIN

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Chicks on the right are now confirming that capital authorities have arrested a former intern for publically releasing personal information belonging to three prominent Republican senators during a heated confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

27-year-old Jackson Cosko was caught after a former co-worker found him using a computer in the Senate offices of Maggie Hassan, where he recently worked as a “legislative correspondent/systems administrator,” but no longer had clearance to use. Cosko was confronted by the co-worker and then he left Hassan’s office.

The staffer then e-mailed the person who had caught him and threatened to release even more information, including information about lawmakers’ children, if they ratted him out. “If you tell anyone I will leak it all. Emails, signal conversations, gmails. Senators’ children’s health information and socials.”

Luckily, the threat did not deter the person from calling the police and they arrested Cosko. Shortly thereafter authorities confirmed that the staffer, Cosko, was not supposed to have access to Hassan’s office and that he used another person’s log-in information to use the computer.

Trending: Mark Zuckerberg Just Stole $315,000 From A Triple-Amputee Vet

If convicted, Cosko faces five federal charges of making public restricted personal information. Along with making threats in interstate commerce, unauthorized access of a government computer, identity theft, and obstruction of justice/witness tampering.

He was also charged with second-degree burglary and unlawful entry in Washington, D.C. He could face up to 20 years in prison if convicted on the charges. Lock him up!

Here is more on doxxing via The Conversation:

“Imagine this: there’s a knock at your door. “Pizza delivery!” It’s the fifth time in the last hour that you’ve had to say to a delivery-person: “No, I really didn’t order anything.” That’s irritating.

“Half an hour later, there’s another noise at the door. This time it’s forced open as your house is stormed by the heavily armed and aggressive special response unit of your local police force. They’re responding to a tip-off that warned them of a hostage situation at your address. That’s not just irritating. That’s dangerous.

“Why is all this happening? Turns out, you’ve come to the attention of a cluster of mischief makers and misanthropes in one of the internet’s dank corners.

“You’ve been “doxxed”. Your private information has been posted, perhaps by an anonymous imageboard user, who’s implored others to “do with it as you will”.

“This might sound far-fetched, but these sorts of internet-enabled attacks have become more frequent in recent years. In fact, the Federal Bureau of Investigation has been cautioning citizens about “swatting” (see below) since 2008.

“It has become common to see articles about how these attacks have affected politicians (both Republican and Democrat in the US), celebrities, journalists, businesses, video game streamers, and public servants.

“What is doxxing?

“Doxxing – named for “documents” or “docs” – is the act of release of someone’s personal and/or identifiable information without their consent. This can include things like their full legal name, social security numbers, home or work addresses and contact information.

“There’s no set format for a “dox”; the doxxer simply publishes whatever information they’ve managed to turn up in their searches. Sometimes this even includes the names and details of their target’s family or close friends.

“As a tactic of harassment, doxxing serves two purposes: it intimidates the people targeted by invading and disrupting their expectations of privacy; and it provides an avenue for the perpetuation of that person’s harassment by distributing information as a resource for future harassers to use.

“Technology and security expert Bruce Schneier argues that 2015 will see even more doxxings, as “everyone from political activists to hackers to government leaders has now learned how effective this attack is”.

“What is swatting?

“Swatting – named for the US police Special Weapons And Tactics (SWAT) teams – is the act of making a false report to the police with the intention of having a heavily armed response team sent to the target’s home.

“This is made even more problematic by the militarisation that local US police forces have undergone in the last decade through initiatives like the Department of Defense’s 1033 program, which allows the pentagon to provide military grade weapons and equipment to local police forces on a free, permanent loan.

“Technology journalist Sarah Jeong describes this as “assault by proxy”, as the police can cause serious injury to the targets of these swatting attacks.

“How do these attacks happen?

“Unfortunately, the technical barrier to doxxing or swatting a person is low. A doxxer can acquire information on their target through a variety of legitimate public sources. Or, more nefariously, through social engineering techniques.

“Swatting often just requires the name, phone number and address of the intended target. Swatters often use cheap or freely available anonymizing technology to disguise their identity, or to “spoof” the phone number of their target, when making their false report — a move that makes their crime difficult to police.

“These attempts also prey on the good faith basis with which emergency responders treat their callers, and as a result valuable police time and resources are diverted away when they may be needed elsewhere.

“How can you protect yourself?

“If you find yourself at the receiving and of these forms of intimidation and abuse, you’ve likely done nothing wrong. People are doxxed and swatted for all sorts of imagined wrongs, as banal as having an opinion on the internet or playing video games.

“Unfortunately, the prevalence of doxxing and swatting is, in part, born of a perfect storm in personal data insecurity and easily-abused systems for reporting crime. There are no perfect solutions for avoiding being doxxed or swatted except making yourself a more difficult target by adopting strong information security practices.

“While the simplest solution for online security is not having online data, this is impractical in the digital age because major parts of our social and professional lives are intermediated through web services. That said, there are a few precautions you can take to increase the security of your data online.

“Google yourself

“One of the first steps in securing your personal details is discovering to what extent they’re already out there and publicly available. If you find old accounts or websites you no longer want, sites like justdelete.me can provide information about having your account deleted from certain websites.

“Don’t re-use passwords for multiple services

“This can be difficult, as a new password for every service you use will be taxing to even the best of memories. The best, most complex passwords will be challenging to guess or to brute-force, but also difficult to remember.

“Here’s where technology can make life easier; a password manager app, like LastPass, KeePass or 1Password can help you set unique, complex passwords for each service you use, and let you secure them behind a single, more memorable password.

“Though password managers come with their own risks, I’d argue that the benefits of using complex passwords can outweigh these.

“Turn on two-factor authentication

“Two-factor authentication requires that people trying to access your account have access to a password as well as a “trusted device” – typically your mobile phone – in order to receive an authentication code before gaining access to your account. The Two Factor Auth website lists popular web services and their support (or lack of support) for two-factor authentication.

“You can find more information in advice from people who’ve experienced these attacks, and at websites like Crash Override Network, a support network for the targets of online abuse that provides some excellent guides on online security, and how to cope with doxxing and swatting attacks.”

Who wants to bet there is more to this story? Does anyone actually believe the narrative that a simple IT staffer did this all on his own? Why would he? Whatever happened here we can rest assured that once the FBI gets done with him he will be singing like a canary and naming names.

 

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Thief Steals Combat Vet’s Military Mementos – ‘I’d Give My Soul To Get Those Things Back’

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Stealing from others is a despicable act in & of itself, but stealing from a veteran who fought for our freedom & security is a whole other ball game. What kind of scumbag would do this kind of thing? We’re hoping this vet gets his belongings back.

Fox 4 Kansas City reported:

“A Mobile veteran served our country overseas more than a decade ago, but the mementos he brought home were stolen.

Carl Sanders Jr. served for four years and had one tour in Iraq.

Most of his memories were packed up in a duffel bag, but it ended up being stolen.

“I don’t regret one second of anything I’ve done serving my country and the people I served with,” he said.

To remember that time in his life he packed up a bag filled with most of his memories. Things like an Iraqi flag and helmet he found on a mission, but most importantly his uniform.

“It’s the boots I lived in, I fought in,” Sanders said. “A soldiers boots and soldiers uniform that’s more important than anything.”

Losing those keepsakes is difficult for Sanders to swallow as he tries to never forget his military service.

“Those things actually reminded me of who I served with, where I’ve been, some of the things we’ve had to do and I don’t ever want to forget that,” Sanders said. “I don’t ever want to let that go.”

While he still has some things, a few pictures and some patches, what was stolen from him goes beyond a uniform.

“I still got a lot of memories in my head, some are hard to remember, some are hard to forget, but as time goes it kind of fades away,” Sanders said. “That’s why I’m glad I do have some of these things, I can always pick up these pictures and look back and always remember.”

While he holds onto what he does have, he hopes the thief realizes what was taken.

“Outside of monetary value things go a lot further than that,” Sanders said. “You never know what something might mean to someone, maybe the smallest little object.”

A soldier’s treasured memories from a half a world away, stolen from a man who served this country.

“God forgive me, but I would give my soul to get those things back,” Sanders said.

From what little he does have left, he is currently putting together a scrapbook for his family so his service is always remembered.”

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Somali Whose Deportation was Thwarted by Passengers Is Gang Rapist With Links To ISIS

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I have no understanding of people who would allow foreigners needs to take precedence over their own citizens.

These deranged SJW lunatics should have been arrested. When does the left not ever defend a terrorist?

From Breitbart:

A Somali man whose deportation was thwarted when passengers on the aeroplane taking him out of the country began complaining is a convicted gang rapist linked to an Islamic State fighter.
29-year-old Yaqub Ahmed was about to be returned to Somalia via a commercial flight to Istanbul, Turkey, but around a dozen ‘social justice warrior’ passengers on the aeroplane became aware of his situation when he began groaning and wailing.

They started complaining “They’re separating him from his family” and chanting “take him off the plane” in rowdy scenes recorded by several people on their mobile phones.

Rather than throw off the disruptive passengers or have them arrested for obstructing the course of justice, however, officials buckled to the mutinous flyers and took Ahmed off the flight, while his supporters applauded and shouted: “You’re free, man!”

However, the Mail on Sunday has now revealed that the busybodies were championing a convicted gang rapist, and that one of his accomplices travelled to the Islamic State to fight as a jihadist after their crime.

In August 2007, Ahmed was part of a four-strong rape gang which lured a 16-year-old girl who had become separated from her friends on a night out to a flat in Crouch End, North London, pretending they were waiting for her there.

Ahmed and his accomplices then took turn raping the teenager, who was only saved when neighbours overheard her cries for help and rang the police. All denied the crime, but were convicted with the help of extensive DNA evidence.

The judge sentenced them to a relatively short nine years each — although police detective Emma Bird seemed happy with the terms, saying they “reflect[ed] the seriousness of this offence” — but criminals almost never serve their full term in the United Kingdom, and Ahmed was out after a paltry four years.

It is understood that fellow rapist Ondogo Ahmed travelled to Syria to fight for the Islamic State just months after his release, while accomplice Adnan Mohamud — like Ahmed, a Somali granted refugee status — is still in Britain.

“We need to deport these people and members of the public should not be allowed to obstruct the proper course of justice,” commented Tory backbencher Philip Hollobone.

“Officials accompanying the deportee need to react appropriately to passengers who do not know what is going on. To simply walk off in the face of passenger confusion is not good enough.”

Britain’s record both tracking and deporting illegal migrants in general is very poor.

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